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Safety on the Run

 

No matter what your experience level, all runners should take some time to think about their safety while running. In general, running is pretty safe, but depending on the time of day you're running, the time of year, and your location a variety of safety concerns may need to be addressed. It's the runner's responsibility to make himself/herself visible especially when it's dark. 

 

No matter what your experience level, all runners should take some time to think about their safety while running. In general, running is pretty safe, but depending on the time of day you're running, the time of year, and your location a variety of safety concerns may need to be addressed. It's the runner's responsibility to make himself/herself visible especially when it's dark. 

 

No matter what your experience level, all runners should take some time to think about their safety while running. In general, running is pretty safe, but depending on the time of day you're running, the time of year, and your location a variety of safety concerns may need to be addressed. It's the runner's responsibility to make himself/herself visible especially when it's dark. 

 

No matter what your experience level, all runners should take some time to think about their safety while running. In general, running is pretty safe, but depending on the time of day you're running, the time of year, and your location a variety of safety concerns may need to be addressed. It's the runner's responsibility to make himself/herself visible especially when it's dark. 

Running in the early morning or in the evening can be especially hazardous. If at all possible, try to run in well lit areas. If that's not possible or you have intermittent areas of darkness, try wearing a headlamp. With the dawn of more powerful batteries and LED bulbs, these handy contraptions are very effective and affordable. The price range varies greatly, but I actually purchased mine for around $25 at Target and have used it for the past two years with great results. Also, wear reflective clothing and/or a reflective vest. The Nike Store currently has a Running Vest for $20.00 that looks very similar to a running singlet.

The best case scenario is to never run alone. Not only is it safer, it's usually more fun. But, running with a buddy is not always realistic. So, if you're running solo, there are a few precautions to take. Just like a pilot submitting a flight plan, runners should let others know where they'll be running. I have several different routes I run. Some are in my neighborhood, some are at the local park, and my longer runs take me down a nearby greenway. Each time I run, I make sure someone in the family is aware of where I'm running. I also try to tell them approximately how long I'll be gone. This way if I don't show back up at home by a certain time, they'll know something may have gone wrong as well as where to start looking for me.

A company called RoadID makes a variety of running identification products that provide your name, address, and other vital information. The IDs are sold in a variety of formats—Wrist ID, Ankle ID, Necklace ID, Shoe ID, Shoe Pouch ID. In the event of an accident, if you can't speak for yourself, the RoadID will. They also have a new version of the product called RoadID Interactive which allows you to build a fully updateable, secure Emergency Response Profile (ERP) that is available to first responders 24 hours a day 365 days a year. To check out all of RoadID's products, just click on the RoadID icon on the right-hand side of the blog.